Carl Einstein’s African Legends

African Legends (ed. Carl Einstein)

Togo

Why people die

I.

The leprosy

Since Uwolowu created diseases, he took fire and cold. Fire is sickness, cold is healing. Uwolowu said to Sropa, a man: “If you are cold, don’t go to the fire.” But he went to the fire. God shouted loudly on his head, and Sropa said to Uwolowu: “I wanted to die, that’s why I went to the fire.” Sropa did not obey Uwolowu. Uwolowu let the rust-brown Ikono (bird) drive out of the fire, Ikono flapped Sropa with his wings; the leprosy broke out of him. The Ikonos’ flutes are a reminder of Sropa’s stubbornness.

Uvolowu and his wives

Uwolowu married two women. One was a frog, the other a kingfisher. He loved the frog more than the kingfisher. He gave all beautiful things to her. One day Uwolowu intended to test both of them; gave each of them seven pots and pretended to be dead. They should weep into the pots. Frog cried first. Krofia tiwe Krowui kro.

Uvolovus’ child

Uwolowu took a wife and had a child for her. The child was very beautiful. Then one day it happened, when the child was in his father’s arms, that it suddenly disappeared. The child moved to another city and did magic. Now it was big, it made the inhabitants of this city unbearable. At last it returned to its city to make war; for it no longer knew that it was its father’s city. It killed a lot of people there. Then it wanted to kill Uwolowu too, it had already pulled the trigger on the rifle, but the rifle failed. Now Uwolowu got up, took his arm and slapped his back with his hand. Then it was turned back into a child. Uwolowu asked: “Since I fathered you, are you coming and wanting to kill me?” So the war came into the world. -

The contractions

Since Uwolowu wanted to create man, he sent a chain down to the earth from above. He began to create a woman and commanded her not to eat salt. When the woman had given birth, and there was still no man, her belly cut off and she ate salt. Uvolowu asked the woman, “What did you not do according to the law that I set, and eat salt?” Hence, when a woman tries to give birth, it hurts.

Uvolovu’s son

Uvolowu took a wife and fathered a son, and the son seemed smarter than him. Whatever Uwolowu said, the son knew better. One day he tried the son. He gave him money to buy the sun and moon. But he did not say this; to himself he thought to check his son whether he knew his thoughts.

Uvolovu’s power

Uwolowu told his children to worship the sub-god in order to hunt a lot of game. They did so, killing and cooking a lot of game. Then Uwolowu said: “If the meat is done, you shouldn’t eat it.” So he said; because he wanted it to be so. He said, “Carry it under the tall tree.” So he spoke so that the people might know that he had created the sub-god.

Uvolovu’s daughter

Uwolowu once gave birth to a girl, he did not want anyone to marry her. So he bought ten men and a dog to watch over the girl. Two of the men went out to make rubber. The girl wanted to get firewood, so the other men went with her. Then a man came and said: “Marry me.” But the girl refused and said: “My father forbade me to marry.” The man asked a second time, the girl consented and the man led her with the eight men and the dog away. On the way the bridegroom devoured five of the slaves; when they got home he devoured the other three. Then he took off his head, as is the custom there. He hid his head and wanted to devour the girl. If anyone came to see the girl, the dog chased them away. During the night he also devoured the dog. Before dawn the girl fled up a tree. Then the bridegroom and his people began to cut the tree. The girl was crying up here, and the people under the tree licked up their tears and said, “If the tears taste so sweet, how delicious must the girl taste.” As the girl was crying, one of the two men heard her and told him other; but he didn’t believe it. Since she was crying the second time, the other heard it too. They loaded the rifles and went where the crying screamed. When they got there, they told the girl to go down. Since she had risen to the ground, the enemies reached out to grab the girl and eat her. Then the slaves killed two of the pursuers, the rest they struck with the sword and led the girl, where they made rubber; they killed a game fed the girl and brought her home in the evening. Uwolowu asked the two if they had found the girl in the bush; for he did not know that it was his child. The two men said: “Eat first, then talk.” As they had eaten, they told Uwolowu that it was his child that he had given them to look after. It went into the bush and was grabbed there by people who wanted to kill it. The next morning he gave the girl to the woman who had a goiter. who would have wanted to kill it. The next morning he gave the girl to the woman who had a goiter. who would have wanted to kill it. The next morning he gave the girl to the wife who had a goiter.

Uvolovu and the larva

Uvolowu and the larva were. The larva said to Uwolowu: “What should be placed on the clouds so that they are light?” Uwolowu told the larva to go to the blacksmith and get the thing that he wanted to put in the clouds. The larva went and wondered what to do because it did not know the thing it was supposed to get. The larva asked each bird for a feather, flew back to Uvolowu and asked him where the larva was. He said he sent them. And Uwolowu said: Since there was nothing in the firmament, he had sent her to fetch the thing that he wanted to put in the firmament. The larva asked again: “What should the larva get?” Uwolowu replied that he had sent them to the blacksmith to forge the sun and moon, and when they glowed and sparkled, she should put these things in her bast sack and bring them to him. When the larva heard this, it flew away again, gave the feathers back to the birds and carried out the task at the blacksmith. The blacksmith gave it to her, and the larva carried it to Uvolowu. Uwolowu asked her: “Who taught you that?” She said: “I thought it up.” Uwolowu now told the larva to put the sun in its place. The larva did so. In the evening, Uvolovu told the larva to put the moon and stars in their place. The larva did so; the moon and stars shone. In the evening, Uwolowu told the larva to put the moon and stars in their place. The larva did so; the moon and stars shone. In the evening, Uwolowu told the larva to put the moon and stars in their place. The larva did so; the moon and stars shone.

The animals of Uvolovus

The animals were. The animals tilled the field. The dirt road was overgrown, Uwolowu gave the law to clear. Everyone prepared to leave, but for the time being they ate. When they ate, they told the dog monkey. The monkey said he had to go to the field and get yams first. When they had eaten, they asked the monkey to go with them; but the monkey said his food was on the fire and had to cook. They went and sent messengers to the monkey to come now. He said he was washing and stayed at home. When they had cut the way, they made a large mound of earth. Now the monkey came too and sat on the hill. Then the little antelope came and asked: “Who is sitting on the hill?” The monkey said: “Me.” The monkey wrestled with the little antelope and threw it down. The hartebeest came; the monkey wrestled with her and threw her down. The buffalo came and said: “Who is sitting on the mound?” The monkey said: “I”, wrestled with him and threw him down. Then the elephant came, wrestled with it and was thrown down. Now the turtle came and asked: “Who is sitting on the hill?” The monkey said: “I” and wrestled with her; the turtle threw the monkey down. The monkey said it had slipped and that a hole should be digged. They did so. They struggled again; this time too the turtle threw the monkey down. Then the monkey got angry, took tree bark and covered the turtle with it. The turtle took a dagger and put it in the fire. When it glowed red, she stabbed the monkey in the buttocks. Now the turtle came and asked: “Who is sitting on the hill?” The monkey said: “I” and wrestled with her; the turtle threw the monkey down. The monkey said it had slipped and that a hole should be digged. They did so. They struggled again; this time too the turtle threw the monkey down. Then the monkey got angry, took tree bark and covered the turtle with it. The turtle took a dagger and put it in the fire. When it glowed red, she stabbed the monkey in the buttocks. Now the turtle came and asked: “Who is sitting on the hill?” The monkey said: “I” and wrestled with her; the turtle threw the monkey down. The monkey said it had slipped and that a hole should be digged. They did so. They struggled again; this time too the turtle threw the monkey down. Then the monkey got angry, took tree bark and covered the turtle with it. The turtle took a dagger and put it in the fire. When it glowed red, she stabbed the monkey in the buttocks. The turtle took a dagger and put it in the fire. When it glowed red, she stabbed the monkey in the buttocks. The turtle took a dagger and put it in the fire. When it glowed red, she stabbed the monkey in the buttocks.

Nabala and death

Death stood on the market path. If a person came, he attacked and killed him. A young man and a virgin came; he attacked this to kill her. Nabala said to death: he should leave them for the time being, so that they can find firewood for him. Having done this, Nabala said to them: “If death says put down the firewood, then refuse and tell death to help you put the firewood down. When he takes the firewood off your head, take a sword and strike him. ”Nabala gave a sword to cut up death. Now that they had struck death, they cut it in half; the legs went up; Head and arms sank into the earth.

Mkwule

The first two people

There were many people up with God. God said, “There shall be many people on earth too,” and hurled two mature people down. One was a man, the companion was a woman. He threw them down with a little seed of any kind and a grain for food. God said to them: “Grind a grain of grain, cover it with the wing.” When they lifted it off, they found a lot of grain to fill themselves for two days. They were served with spinach, pumpkin and beans. God also gave them two fish. They put them in the water in which the fish multiplied for food.

The innocence

At first they didn’t know anything about the witness. One day the woman said to the man: “I have a wound in my body, boil water to wash it.” He sott, washed, washed. It didn’t heal. He said: “What is this, the wound does not close?” God saw the people what they were doing and said: “They are simple-minded, that I may send them the Son of Wisdom to teach them.” So the knee swelled the woman, swelled, swelled. One day a child came out. The wise, the knower. As he fell on the earth, he began to say, “What you wash is not a wound. Know the woman that she is giving birth to a man. ”The man went, recognizing his woman who was giving birth to a girl.

The sin

The girl grew up and got married. Then the mother-in-law gave her a grain and said: “Grind this one grain on the stone, cover the flour with the wing.” The mother-in-law went into the field. The bride stayed behind and said: “How are we supposed to be satisfied with a grain, I’ll take a lot of grain, a basket full.” When the mother-in-law returned to the village, she saw what the bride had done, wept and said, “Oh, you are spoiling man’s earth, now we have to work every day; must die of hunger. “God came and said:” You are spoiling the earth, now you have to plant a lot, you have to die to death. “

Resurrection

I.

The child of wisdom

The man was with grains in his hair. The wise man said to him: “Let’s go out, chop tree branches.” He chopped, burned them. The wise man scratched man’s hair, scattered seeds on the earth where the tree branches had been burned. The man returned to the tree, looked, said: “Verily, the grass sprouts from the seed.” He came again, saw the grass as the heads above became reddish. He said to his followers: “Harvest that we may see.” They reaped, cleaned in the mortar, spread under the sun, ground on the stone, saw flour, it was white. The man said: “Boil it in a pot so that we can see.” They cooked, tasted, were happy, said: “It’s sweet, how very much.” Now people knew the gruel, their food.

Dahome

Why woman is subject to man

Since Mahu had created man and woman, he set them apart; but so that they could hear each other when they were talking. They had eyes, they didn’t see. They had legs, they were of no use to them. They rolled like cans of palm oil.

A slippery story

Long before Dahome was founded, there was a king named Dadase.

The origin of fish and darkness

Formerly the sun shone surrounded by her children, just as today the moon shines with its own, the stars.

Evening and morning

Evening and morning are brothers.

Sayings of the Fang

Sun, moon and stars

In the beginning the sun and moon were man and woman. They lived together and had many children. The children of the sun and moon are called stars. The sun, moon and stars do not eat the same foods as we do. They feed on fire and that is why they shine. In the beginning, the sun and moon were man and woman.

The story of Ngurangurane, the crocodile man

A long time ago there lived a great wizard, called Ngurangurane, the crocodile man. It tells how he was born; that’s the first thing. What he did and how he died is the second thing. To relate all of your deeds is impossible; and also who could remember them. -

The death of the crocodile

Ngurangurane, the child of the crocodile and the chief’s daughter, grew every day; the child becomes a young man, the young man becomes a young man. Then he becomes the chief of his people. He was a powerful chief and a skilled magician. In his heart there was a great desire to avenge the death of the chief, his mother’s father, to free his people from the tribute, with which the crocodile oppresses them. It tells what happened.

The worship of the crocodile

The crocodile lies stretched out on the lakeshore. So the next morning Ngurangurane does:

The death of Nguranguran

Ngurangurane is a great chief. He leads the Fang to war, they always win. Ngurangurane knows when the enemy is approaching. That’s how he knows.

The three sons of Ada

A woman named Ada gave birth to triplets. The men of the tribe wanted to kill them as usual. Ada begged her to leave the children with her until evening. Some wanted, others didn’t. The chief of the village came and said, “Let’s leave the children until tomorrow.” So they were left.

Angonzing and Ndongmba

Giants and dwarves are present. Every chief has called his warriors, all have heard the call of the Tam-Tam. The giants advance through the forest. Ndongmba leads them, armed with the three magic arrows. The first reaches what it aims at above the clouds, the second pierces the deepest water, the third penetrates the bottom of the earth. Nlutangmba carries the famous crossbow. Instead of arrows, she hurls huge rocks. Under the impact of this load, people are crushed like ants. The blood flows like oil squeezed out of palm nuts. A strong hunter carries the famous crossbow.

Akulenzame, the man with the sack

One day a young woman was walking through the forest to pick the fruits of the Oba, to prepare oil. On her way back to the village with a basket full of fruit, she met Otutuma, the spirit of the woods. After returning to the hut, she gave birth to her firstborn son. The father, after putting him on the leaf of a banana, recognized him as his child and called him Akulenzame, that’s the madman. This is the birth of Akulenzamen.

Bingo

It happened, Nzame descended to earth. He enjoyed the river and drove himself in a boat that swam all by itself. Nzame did not row. He landed at the big village where he wanted to go unnoticed to question the people. A girl came to the river to draw water. Nzame saw and loved her; for she worked well and was just as hard at work as she was beautiful. He gave her a son and took her with him far into the country from which one does not return. Mboya, that was the girl’s name, never returned. -

Bingo and the spider

Bingo has taken refuge in the depths of a cave. The cave is deep and black. Bingo thinks in his heart, I am safe here and he will stay there for a long time.

Legends of the Ababua

I.

It was a long time ago a man called Mba, he wove the earth and all things. After that the sky was below and the earth above. But Mba, who found nothing to eat, said: “Now the sky must go up and the earth down.”

II

Mba ate honey, met women on the riverbank and said: “What are you doing there?”

III

Another time Mba went to the elephant’s village. The elephant said: “See, you are there.”

IV

Another day Mba went to the pangolin village. The pangolin said: “The rain falls, which drives the ants out, let’s go into the forest.” Mba says: “Let’s make a basket to carry the ants.”

V

Another time Mba went to his friend Sumbani’s village. When he came to the plantations, he saw that it had set fire on the fallen tree trunks.

VI

Another time Mba went into the forest and came to a Malimbini (dryad) village. He thought they were trees and wanted to cut a branch with the knife.

VII

Another time Mba went to the village of the Kangalimbosso, and the old man of the village said, “Here is the house you can sleep in.” The house was so small that it cramped Mba’s body. Mba said: “I don’t want to sleep here today. I have a house that needs to be finished. “

VIII

Another day Mba said to his mother: “Get into this tree, hide yourself when there is war.”

IX

Another time Mba went to the Bangobo village and saw the Bangobo laying their entrails on the ground before climbing up the trees. Mba said to the Bangobo: “Take my bowels.”

X

Another day Mba found many mushrooms on a cut tree stump. Mambotete said, “This is a good dish.” She wanted to cook it. Mba says, “Go away, you don’t know this thing.” He took the whole tree on his shoulder and carried it away. But the tree stuck to his skin, and when he went to sleep he had to sleep with the tree.

XI

But Cephalophe put an end to Mba’s malice.

Boloki

Libanza

A man and a woman were. The woman became pregnant. Since she was close to giving birth, she no longer wanted to eat. She asked for saffron fruits and asked her husband to steal them. The man went, brought the Safus, and the woman ate. One day the owner surprised the thief and killed him.

Upoto

Libanza

Long time ago, Libanza wasn’t born. There were two women, two sisters, who lived on a large tree. The sisters had wonderful voices and it was a pleasure to hear them sing.

Bena-Kanioka

The tree of God

The animals had gone hunting; When they found a tree that was bearing fruit and did not know its name, they sent the antelope and said, “Go, ask God for the name.” The antelope had gone, asked. God said the name; he said: “The tree is mine, the tree is speckled. This is my dear tree, Speckled. ”As the antelope ran the path, the name fell away. -

The woman and the bird

A woman had given birth; her child was a son. He went to war. An arrow was shot in his heart; he died. His friends put him on the bier.

The ogres

The hunter went hunting with his dogs. The rain surprised him. He went into a hut for protection. He met the ogre with the two heads. He sat down to see the one with the three heads; he came and asked the two-headed: “Ah, ogre two-headed, he has a head, where does he come from?” Dreikopf said, “Let us tell him the Master is coming.” So every ogre that came spoke, and the Master came.

Molowi

One man had children, four daughters. They grabbed their father in his courtyard and said, “Give us your most beautiful daughter.” They took Kahafwabanza. As they passed, she wept and sang:

The animals kill the mothers

All the animals said to one another, “Let’s kill our mothers.” They beat their mothers to death. Kamundi took his and went to hide it in a cave in a tree. Every day he went there to eat manioc bread, and when he ate until he was full, he brought the others fruit.

Bakuba legends

The orb of the chiefs of Bangala

A chief from a village called Bangala Ganga went to Zappo Lumbumba one day to celebrate a festival.

Origin of the consecration ceremony (Bambala)

Once upon a time there lived a man who had a son, and as the boy grew and became manable, he often fetched palm wine in the forest. He drank the wine alone without ever thinking about his father and mother. The father said to him: “Why, my son, do you never give me the palm wine that you bring?” But the boy said: “I never bring palm wine, and when I bring it I do as I please.”

Origin of the friction drum

Kashashi, wife of King Samba Mikepe, was pretty and skilled; but like most Bangongo, she was vicious. One day her husband surprised her in adultery with a man of low origin. He was very angry, put the combit’s feathers in the corners of his mouth, threw himself on the adulterer and killed him with the knife. When the people asked what had become of the man, Samba Mikepe replied, Koy Na Bula, the leopard of the village (that is, the grater drum), devoured him. Since then, human sacrifices have been made to the sound of this drum.

The origin of the masks

Some time after Samba Mikepe married Kashashi, she gave birth to a child. One day she went out of the village to fetch water. The child ran after. She said to him: “Go to the village and stay with your father while I get water.”

Origin of the mask Mashamboy (Bambala)

Once upon a time in the waters there lived a spirit called Mashamboy who afflicted the people with a disease called Geji. Those afflicted with the disease lost sight, fell down as if they were drunk and died. Since Bo Kena was the chief, a man named Bokoboko went into the forest and suddenly saw this ghost. Terrified, he ran into the village and told the chief what he had seen. Bo Kena ordered him to describe the ghost. Bokoboko said, “It’s so terrible that I can’t describe it in words. But give me the time and resources, I will educate you. ”Bo Kena agreed. Bokoboko built a hut far from the village and started work. He asked for bast cloth, bird feathers and the fur of a larger bat. Bo Kena gave him the first two things, ordered the people of the village, to catch a bat and sent him the animal. Bokoboko made a mask that looked like Mashamboy; he took two trees, won two colors, one yellow and the other black; with these colors and the white earth he painted the mask he had made. From the leftover material he made a robe with which he covered the body. This robe was supple and fitted exactly to the body. It was made up of little triangles of cloth dyed white and black and sewn together. After finishing this, he showed it to the king. “Ah,” said the king, “this is exactly what I need.” A few days later the king disappeared. His wives and subjects mourned his death and asked, “Where is the Nijmi?” As the sun fell asleep, a strange thing appeared; in the village one had never seen anything like it before. That was the king dressed in the mask Mashamboy; nobody recognized him. He danced about and frightened women and children, and finally he disappeared. He took off his mask and robe in the bush and carefully hid them. Then he went to his village dressed as usual, where he was greeted with joy. Women and children spoke to him of the terrible ghost they had seen yesterday. “I know what it was, it was Mashamboy who gave us the Geji. He came to see whether there weren’t quarrelsome women and bad children in the village. If he found such, he would have sent the terrible disease. ”So the women and children were frightened and promised to be calm and obedient. Then he went to his village dressed as usual, where he was greeted with joy. Women and children spoke to him of the terrible ghost they had seen yesterday. “I know what it was, it was Mashamboy who gave us the Geji. He came to see whether there weren’t quarrelsome women and bad children in the village. If he found such, he would have sent the terrible disease. ”So the women and children were frightened and promised to be calm and obedient. Then he went to his village dressed as usual, where he was greeted with joy. Women and children spoke to him of the terrible ghost they had seen yesterday. “I know what it was, it was Mashamboy who gave us the Geji. He came to see whether there weren’t quarrelsome women and bad children in the village. If he found such, he would have sent the terrible disease. ”So the women and children were frightened and promised to be calm and obedient.

The origin of iron

One day Woto found a large stone that Bumba, the god, had excreted. “What is this?” He asked. The people replied: “That is God’s departed.” Woto ordered that they be carried to the village and venerated. The following night Woto watched Bumba in a dream; he said to him: “You have acted wisely, honoring everything that comes from me; even my excreted. As a reward, I will teach you how to use it. ”So Bumba instructed Woto to pull iron out of stone.

How to light the fire

A man named Kerikeri lived under the rule of Muchu Mushanga. One night he dreamed that Bumba had come to see him and instructed him to go a certain way, to break branches of a certain tree and to take care of them. He did so, and as the branches were quite dry, Bumba appeared again in a dream, wishing him luck in his obedience and instructing him to make a fire by rubbing. Kerikeri kept the secret, and when by chance all the fires in the village had gone out, he sold fire to the neighbors at a high price. All the clever and cunning tried to solve the mystery, but the latter kept it carefully.

The light

Since Woto was leaving Moelos village there was no sun; there was none. Moelo was confused by the darkness; he complained that if he got married he could not see whether the woman was beautiful or ugly; when he plucks a fruit, he cannot see whether it is ripe or not; when a man approaches him, he cannot say whether he is friend or foe. So he called three of his people and said to them: “Why did I allow Woto to leave the village? He is skilful and would certainly have found a cure for the darkness. Go find him; Ask him to forget the injustice my son did him and give us a means of seeing in light. In order for your mission to succeed, avoid arguments and do not dwell on fishing. Pay attention, do not go wrong, do not fail and do not fish in the rivers. «So the three men, the Kalonda, traveled Binga and Buimba were called to look for Woto. They went, they went until they came to a large bank, and Binga said, “Let’s stop and fish.” “No,” replied the others, “don’t you remember Moelo’s words?” Binga didn’t want to hear them, scolded she and began to fish despite her counter-argument. So Kalonda and Buimba saw that it was useless to continue the journey and returned to Moelo. When they arrived, Moelo asked, “Did you bring the light?” “No,” they replied, “Binga disobeyed your command, he quarreled with us and stopped fishing; so it was useless to go on and we scolded her and began to fish despite her counter-argument. So Kalonda and Buimba saw that it was useless to continue the journey and returned to Moelo. When they arrived, Moelo asked, “Did you bring the light?” “No,” they replied, “Binga disobeyed your command, he quarreled with us and stopped fishing; so it was useless to go on and we scolded her and began to fish despite her counter-argument. So Kalonda and Buimba saw that it was useless to continue the journey and returned to Moelo. When they arrived, Moelo asked, “Did you bring the light?” “No,” they replied, “Binga disobeyed your command, he quarreled with us and stopped fishing; so it was useless to go on, and so did we returned. ”So Moelo hit Binga and said:“ You no longer go with the others. ”He turned to Kalonda and Buimba:“ Travel again in search of Woto and take my dog ​​instead of bingas. ”So they got up again the way, this time with Moelo’s dog.

The palm wine

At the time of creation there was a large lake very near the area where the Bushonge lived, and that lake contained palm wine, not water; every time one was thirsty he went to fetch wine. One day Nankhamba, a woman, pissed in the lake. But she was seen by Boyo Bumba, a man, who said, “Aren’t you ashamed to pollute the lake from which everyone drinks? I’ll tell the villagers what you’ve done. ”He did, and everyone said they weren’t drinking the wine of the lake anymore. The next day Boyo Bumba returned to the village and said, “See how we are punished for the woman’s offense, the lake has dried up.” So it was; the lake was gone and in its place was a ravine in which four unknown species of young trees were seen. They named the trees Shamba, Mibondo, Ikori and Djana. But they paid no attention to them and mourned the loss of their lake. The years passed. The trees grew wide and, where the lake had been, grew into the forest. One day Bunyi, a motwa, spoke to himself: “Where has the lake gone; is he not absorbed by the trees? I’ll make a hole in it, and I’ll see who its sap is like. ”He went, climbed a tree, and made a hole at the top; but no juice flowed. He returned home determined to give up searching; In a dream a man appeared to him and said: “A good idea is not without perseverance. Go and try again. ”The next day, Bunyi went to the tree and saw a thin thread of sap flowing from the hole he had drilled; he tasted and found sweets; so he hung up a vessel to collect the drops and returned to the village, but he said nothing of his find. Every day the amount of juice increased, became stronger, and every day he had to add a larger vessel to collect the flowing. One day, after having drunk the contents of his largest vessel, he came into the village drunk; he molested many and was brought before the Nyimi. The Nyimi questioned him about the cause of his strange behavior, but Bunyi refused to provide information, if not in secret. This was granted, and as he was telling his story, the king sent a messenger to check whether he had spoken true. As the narrative has been proven he molested many and was brought before the Nyimi. The Nyimi questioned him about the cause of his strange behavior, but Bunyi refused to answer, if not in secret. This was granted, and as he was telling his story, the king sent a messenger to check whether he had spoken true. As the narrative has been proven he molested many and was brought before the Nyimi. The Nyimi questioned him about the cause of his strange behavior, but Bunyi refused to provide information, if not in secret. This was granted, and as he was telling his story, the king sent a messenger to check whether he had spoken true. As the narrative has been proven the Nyimi announced the secret to the people and everyone went to collect palm kernels and plant them all over the country.

The suicide

Badja, a man, went into the woods with his son. The son suddenly died in the forest, and the father returned to the village alone. When he came the people asked him: “Badja, where is your son?” He replied: “He’s lying dead in the forest.” to show in the village; return immediately to the forest and don’t let yourself be seen here. ‘So Badja went back into the forest, wandered around and didn’t know how to let herself go. At last he shouted: “I don’t want to live like this anymore; How can I die? ”He took a long vine, tied one end to a branch, climbed up, and rolled the other end around his neck. When he did this, he flung himself into space.

Succubus

There were two brothers, Ganda and Lusumba; they had a sister. The three of them lived in the forest, far from everyone, in a simple hut, as was the custom at the time. One night a ghost came and joined the sister; She got pregnant. -

Baluba

Creation of the world

An old chief in Kukiga relates:

Hiking history

I.

Origin of the violence of the chiefs of Urua

Formerly, that is far in the ages, Kahatwa, son of Zazali, came from a far country, beyond the Lomami, to the west. He settled on the shores of Lake Kisale, on the beach of Kamelondo. He and his two wives were members of the Bwina-Mbayo family. One of the women remained sterile; so her name is forgotten. The other was called Ndai and was from the Benaluba or Baluba tribe. Since her birth she was consecrated to Kongolo, the Spirit. Kongolo is a double being, made up of two snakes, male and female. Both live on different banks; from time to time they wed over our heads. Their agreement shimmers brightly over the people. This is the rainbow (in Kiluba: Kongolomwamba).

Hiking history

III

From the origin of the brotherhoods Buyangwe, Kabwala, Balumba

One day Kazula, a resident of the Luowaufers, was hunting Suya in the mountains. He wounded a wild boar that was scratching cassava. Despite the wound, the animal was able to escape and flee into a cave. The hunter chased it and pressed after him into the dark, hoping to kill it. He was astonished when the ground sank beneath his feet and he stood alone in thick darkness with no hope of getting out. For a while he crawled groping to escape the terrible underworld. Seeing the futility of his efforts, he despaired. Suddenly a strange game appeared to his eyes. In the foreground, very close to him, was his deceased brother; he looked at him with wide eyes. Behind his brother an escort of dream figures; indestructible beings in special transparent robes; they performed choirs and dances of death. After a brief reflection, the dead recognized Kazula and saw how pearls of cold sweat stood on his limbs and his knees collapsed in shock. He spoke in the voice of the grave that he tried to sweeten:

Origin of the Mikisi Mihake

One day Ngoy sought out Nkulu, the spirit; said to him: “Great spirit, don’t you see how miserable people are? Illness, wars and famine torment the helpless. Give me a cure for such ailments. ”Nkulu agreed to his request. He took a thumb-length statuette from the bottom of Lake Kila, his place of residence, intended to serve as a model (canon). “Ngoy,” he said, “here I give you the unmistakable Remedies for all ailments. Go to the people and tell them to make fetishes like this one. Then bring it to me. ”Ngoy did. He called Bwana Kilumba, the magician, and taught him to make similar pictures. The wizard made them in various imitations and gave them to Ngoy, who brought them to Nkulu.

Legend

At the very beginning there was a man and a woman on earth. One day the woman goes into the forest to collect wood. In a thick bush she hears noise in the branches. Amazed, she turns. A voice emerges from the thicket and says: “Come here, I have something to tell you, to reveal a secret.” The woman, curious to find out what this is, approaches and sees a strange creature on a bush; like a dragon. She goes even closer and says: “Who are you and what do you want me?” The voice replies: “I am Kizimu and I bring you great benefit. Here are two fruits that enclose something precious. Be careful not to open it. Your husband must have received his first; for a fruit is destined for each of you. If you have given your husband the fruit intended for him, take yours and open it.

From compassionate death

It happened that an unfortunate man, abandoned by everyone, sat alone on the mat. He sighs and complains that he has nowhere to find relief or support. His hut is falling into disrepair; Wind wets and rain lashes him. He cannot find wood to warm the old bones; no one to promise him support or hope. Then he calls death. This comes quickly. A relative whom he called, or a deceased person with a compassionate heart approaches him; Kabezya-Mpungu allowed him to be removed from the world.

The Tanganika

Far up on a mountain stood a bare rock where the birds came to rest. Which birds? We do not know it; they were big birds. So they were thirsty and said let’s try to take water, and they struck the rock with their beaks with such force that the beaks broke. They died. Others came, did the same, and died.

Bahololo

Legend of Muamba and Kunga Nsungu

Once upon a time, people didn’t make war. They had arrows to kill the animals. That was all. You didn’t die of diseases or other things.

Why we die

In the beginning one day God, the great Spirit, called the first man and the first woman to him; likewise the snake. In order to try it out, with his hand closed, he showed the woman a fruit pit and another to the snake. “These are the kernels of mortality and eternal life. Choose, ”he says. The woman takes the fruit of mortality, the serpent the fruit of immortality. “I pity you,” said God to the woman, “that you chose death while the serpent gained eternal life.” That is why people die, but the serpent lives forever.

Western Uruwa

Kabezy-Mpungu sent a man and two women to earth. These first inhabitants of the earth lived happily until one woman began to age. The great spirit had foreseen this and given her the gift of rejuvenation; and strength that you may succeed in keeping the gift, for yourself and for all people. Seeing herself shriveled up, she takes the grain wing of her companion, who just wanted to swing corn, destined for mead, and locks herself inside the hut. She carefully closes the door. Then she tears off all the old skin, which she can easily free herself from, and places the pieces on the wing. Immediately skin appeared fresh like that of a small child. This event was drawing to a close; there was nothing left to cover but the head and neck. Then the companion approached the hut to take the swing arm. The old woman did not have time to prevent her; she had already pushed open the door. But alas, at the same moment the woman, almost rejuvenated, falls dead to earth. That’s why we all have to die.

Baholoholo
Eastern Uruwa

Once the earth was uninhabited; Kabezya-Mpunga created it. So he sent Kyomba, the first man, and two women. Since he sent them, he gave him tools to make fire. He put the seeds of the plants in his hair. Kyomba went out one day and saw small plants, barely sprouted. He realized that they were from the seed he carried in his hair. The plants ripened and produced corn, eleusine and cassava, the food of the people. He tasted it and found it sweet. (So ​​far he lived on forest berries.) He began to sow. To do this you have to dig up the ground. For a while he tries a sharpened wood. It is troublesome. A little later he is looking for a sharp stone, which he puts on a handle. Finally he discovers a sharp iron that is even harder. This time the work goes on quickly. It is good. He won’t change anymore.

The one who rose from the grave tells:

I walked long, long; Months and months and I came to an area where there were banana trees. There I met a woman; I asked that she show me the apartment of Kalunga-Niembo, the chief of the dead. She showed me a high stone wall that ran along a path. I followed him month and month; i met a man; asked him to show me the Kalunga-Niembo apartment.

Kamwepolo

One day a father sent his son to hunt and said, “If you kill a buffalo and you cannot carry it home, call Kamwepolo.”

The hyena

That was in the evening in a Baholoholo village. They danced. A woman would have liked to dance, she too. But she had a child in her arms, a young baby, and her husband was not there. -

A creation saga from Tanganika

I.

Warundi (Urunda)

Good and bad times

Once there was no war, people did not die in large numbers. There was no shortage of food. There was a lot of food. All the cows threw, did not die. Anything flourished. Now, under King Kisabo, all things perish. There is hunger, sickness in great numbers; people die, there is a lack of food, famine destroys them, people perish in misery. There is no unity, all people fight each other, kill each other. So there is nothing here but fighters. Nsare had no warriors. Kisabo owns warriors. Things are in shout, thrust and turmoil; things were different under Nsare. But under Kisabo, people fight. Brother eats brother, wrestles with brother. Nobody loves the other, kill each other. Unity came to an end; things are finished.

transformation

People went looking for firewood. They had collected wood and were returning home, when they met relatives who had been hit (ghosts) and who had wandered far away where one cannot go. Those who returned from the search for firewood went to the bank into the reeds. There they walked and ate mud. Then they were turned into cranes. Once they were people. Then wings came to them. They swung away.

Against the dead

A man lost his child; he buried it. In the evening he said to the woman that she should see if something was coming out of the pit. The woman went to see the child; and she saw that the child had come out of the hole. She took a pestle for pounding, hit the head, and made it come back. Said: ‘Let him die, keep calm; and the other people, everyone remains silent. ‘Once people died, rose from the grave. Now they do not rise, they stay with their ancestors in the country.

The juggler of the plain

I.

Ba Ronga

Motikatika

Since Motikatika was still in the womb, his mother stopped taking any food. She no longer ate, she no longer drank, she no longer dressed.

Sikulume

It so happened that Mazinga married the women. All of them had children, but the first of the women had none. So she was made ridiculous by the other women. Even her husband scoffed at her and did not even say that she was nothing.

Nuahungukuri

A man named Nuahungukuri took a wife; but he hadn’t built his hut next to other people. He led her to himself, apart. He was an ogre.

Dukuli, the hyena man

A man by the name of Dukuli went to the village of Nuamatchakammbe to see and marry young girls. Parents agreed and gave him a wife. The girlfriends went to the wedding vows. They came out of the huts with their mothers and began to cook the food. Since they were bringing them here, Dukuli went away into the forest. There he began to sing and called his friends, the animals, to eat. He spoke:

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Dirk writes on philosophy, literature, and health. He blogs on https://unglaublich.de/, https://www.keyando.net/ and https://medizindoc.de/

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